General Education Core Category/Marker Descriptions

The following are brief descriptions of the General Education Core categories and markers, their methods, and learning goals.

Humanities and Fine Arts (GLT, GFA, GPR)

Literature (GLT)

Students read and write about selected works of prose and/or poetry from diverse cultural traditions, analyzing the context, aims, and methods of literary expression.

Fine Arts (GFA)

By focusing on painting, sculpture, architecture, drama, dance, cinema, or music, students gain understanding of the aims and methods of artistic expression and the role of cultural traditions and artistic value in human society.

Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Perspectives (GPR)

For two or more significant philosophical, ethical, and/or religious traditions, students examine and compare assumptions, modes of thought, and attendant practices, and analyze their effects on behavior.

Historical Perspectives (GHP)

Students use an historical approach to a specific region and period to explore the context of events (social structure, economics, political systems, culture, or beliefs), evaluate evidence and divergent interpretations, and communicate historical ideas in writing.

Natural Sciences (GNS)

By focusing on the concepts of one physical or biological science, students gain understanding of scientific inquiry as they analyze empirical information, distinguish between primary research and secondary reports, and communicate effectively about scientific issues.

Mathematics (GMT)

Students gain the skills to perform computations on data, to use mathematical principles to solve problems, and to reason with and manipulate concepts within a mathematical system.

Reasoning and Discourse (GRD)

Students gain skills in intellectual discourse, including constructing cogent arguments, locating, synthesizing and analyzing documents, and writing and speaking clearly, coherently, and effectively.

Social and Behavioral Science (GSB)

By focusing on a particular discipline which studies the behavior of individuals, groups, or organizations, students learn to use its methodology and theoretical framework to interpret, analyze, and evaluate the broader social contexts of individual events or situations.

Global (GL)

In a course in any subject, students focus on the interconnections among regions of the world, interpret and evaluate information on diverse ecologies, human societies, artistic achievements, or political systems, and gain sensitivity to cultural differences on a global scale.

Global Non-Western (GN)

In a course in any subject, students focus on the interconnections among regions of the world other than North America, Great Britain, and continental Europe, interpret and evaluate information on diverse ecologies, human societies, artiste achievements, or political systems, and gain sensitivity to cultural differences on a global scale.

Speaking Intensive (SI)

In a course in any subject, students receive instruction in an appropriate mode of oral communication (interpersonal or small group communication, or presentational speaking), and enhanced opportunities to practice improvement of oral communication skills.

Writing Intensive (WI)

In a course in any subject, students demonstrate their understanding of its concepts and materials through writing, using constructive criticism from readers to revise drafts and produce one or more clear, coherent, and effective written assignments appropriate to the field.


 

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